Arkansas Arts Center

Secret “Yarn Bomb” Raises Funds and Eyebrows By kdawson

The work.

In conjunction with the secret yarn bomb exhibit, the Contemporaries, an affiliate-membership group made up of young art enthusiasts, decided to host a fundraising event to raise awareness about their group and also help raise money to donate a piece of art to the AAC Collectors Show in December.

Stone Ward was tasked in creating a name for the event as well as the promotion plan for the inaugural fundraiser. The agency developed a visually compelling and unifying look for the event and named it Fountain Fest, since the majority of the event would center around the newly yarn bombed fountain in front of the AAC.

The brief.

For months, the Arkansas Arts Center (AAC) had been quietly planning a surprise outdoor art installation for the Central Arkansas community. After more than 40 hours, the AAC was “yarn bombed” on September 13.

This cultural phenomenon of yarn bombing is a type of graffiti or street art that uses colorful art displays of knitted or crocheted yarn. With the help of AAC staff, artist Chelsea Garrett from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and dedicated volunteers around the world, the yarn bomb color scheme connected more than 1,200 square feet of yarn collected locally and from as far as Chile.

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The result(s).

With the help of the agency’s public relations outreach, the AAC yarn bomb and Fountain Fest event received more than a dozen media hits from local outlets, in addition to raising more than $2,000 for the Contemporaries.

Stone Ward is proud to support the Arkansas Arts Center and their mission to ensure that education, inspiration and creative expression in the arts flourish throughout Arkansas.